click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
WETA 12
LANGUAGE
English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
the afghanistan strategy and bring home all of the combat truce by the end of next year. also, a conversation with noted british historian and and the four men -- amanda foreman. she has a new book called "a war on fire." >> every community has martin luther king boulevard. that is the cornerstone we all know could is not just a street garble bought, but a place to gather with your community. make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. we are happy to joinim h to combat illiteracy. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> jeff merkely wrote an op-ed in the new york times on tuesday titled let's not linger in afghanistan. he joins us tonight on capitol hill. thank you for your time. >> is great to be with you. when you say that we are lingering in afghanistan, can you define the word "lingering" for me? >> that means that our mission has been completed. in this case, the mission was to take the taliban out of power in afghanistan, to destroy al qaeda training camps, and to find those responsible for 9
in afghanistan. they also have the pakistani taliban attacking them. we're also the point of a new low in u.s.-pakistani relations. so the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable to me. >> what about indian intelligence-gathering and a security? there have been a number of threats, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authorities competence in this area? >> there will be questioned about another attack in mumbai. again, four attacks in the last 10 years. after 2008, there were major reviews within india about internal security, and in this case, there will be a very close examination of how quickly india responded. they have their national security guard deployed there. they have friends a unit on the scene. they need to hopefully -- they have forensic units on the scene. they need to hopefully see having that experience corrected in that beleaguered city. >> in other news, police and venezuela have regained control of a prison east of the capital after a standoff that lasted for 27 days. more than 800 inmates have not g
day of his visit to afghanistan, for nato's silk -- for nato soldiers were killed. which all begs -- which all begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? >> british troops drop in. it's an area the taliban used to control. no longer. nato is pushing out. that is what you can do when 10,000 british troops have been reinforced by 20,000 americans. so far, the british soldiers have not run into any opposition. usually when the insurgents see nato coming in strength, they retreat. but not always. so no one takes any chances. afghan police lead the searches. nato believes afghan candy -- afghans can deal with their own people better than foreign troops. by 2015, the idea is they will do it alone. one of the villagers hope things will improve without the insurgents around. >> the taliban steals food. i'm very poor. if i protest, they say you support nato. >> this is what progress lookalike in afghanistan. so much so, there is to be a further cut in british troops with a few hundred soldiers. but native troops still far outnumber the afghan troops. what is needed to ha
of honor, today for heroism in afghanistan. during a fight in 2008, sergeant first class leroy petry was shot in both legs and lost his right hand when he tried to throw back an enemy grenade. his actions saved two other rangers. president obama presented the medal at a white house ceremony this afternoon. later, outside the white house, petry said all of the troops serving overseas are heroes. >> whenever you have a chance or opportunity to thank them, check them, give them a pat on the back for the job they've done because they've earned it. that's the british award any service member can get is just a simple thank you. >> sreenivasan: petry is the 149th recipient of the medal of honor, and he is only the second living service member to receive one for service in iraq or afghanistan. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: next tonight, an assassination in afghanistan takes the life of the president's half-brother. >> ahmed wali karzai had survived previous attempts on his life but today a family friend finally did what others could not. the provi
afghanistan today. four nato troops were killed in bombings in the east and south. and, eleven afghan policemenç died in separate attacks. amid the killings, general david petraeus-- commander of u.s. and nato troops in afghanistan-- handed over his duties. he is leaving to lead the central intelligence agency. his replacement is u.s. marine corps general john allen. >> it is my intention to maintain the momentum of this campaign, this great campaign on which we have embarked. i will continue to support in every way possible, the recruiting, the training, preparation and equipping and the fielding and the employment of the afghaf oational security forces.ç >> sreenivasan: allen's tenure began just a day after taliban insurgents claimed another high- profile assassination. a close aide to afghan president hamid karzai was killed sunday in a gunbattle at his home in kabul. it followed the murder of karzai's half-brother last week. for more on afghanistan we turn to pam constable, who covers south asia for the "washington post." pam, thanks for being with us. the series of high prof
-- investigator. the prime minister arrived from afghanistan into the storm. >> we need to have an inquiry, possibly inquiries into what has happened. we are no longer talking about politicians and celebrities. we're talking about murder victims, potentially terrorist victims, having their phones tapped into. >> what happened in the newsroom of the news of the world is already being investigated by 50 police officers. now there will be inquiries into why the police took so long to take this seriously. what is wrong with the british media? this all began with the imprisonment four years ago of the upload news of the world," royal editor. also in prison was this man. >> due to legal constraints, the state of coming home or come in at the moment. >> it is his notes of private phone numbers that have fueled this dog up. that and the mounting anger of mps who have said that police do not want to investigate what he has done. rupert murdoch issued a statement describing what had happened as deplorable and unacceptable. he stated that "our company must fully cooperate with the police and said tha
that great contributions of this for the wars in afghanistan and iraq only 24% said increased domestic spending. and while there is a lot of focus on domestic spending, if you talk to the ode person, it's -- that spending is seen as -- if it involves waste, fraud and abuse. but when benefits or when the entitlements are considered, that's not considered waste, fraud and abuse. >> so when you -- when you asked him about the trade-off they're prepared to accept in terms of, you know, how much cutting are you as a citizen prepared to see, to deal with the debt what do you find? >> surprisingly, when you ask about what is more important, preserving benefits for social security and medicare, or reducing deficit or the debt, 2 to 1 people say preserve our benefits. there is very little give there. now republicans are of the -- more of the view that reducing the deficit should be given high priority. but even among republicans it's really interesting. there is a big income divide. affluent republicans say it is more important to reduce the deficit but poorer republicans, middle class and lowe
are investigating the case of james phillips and, killed in afghanistan. according to his father, e-mail messages he received after his death had been read. he suspects, by hackers. >> they should suffer whatever punishment is appropriate. i'm sure that will happen. it is going to take time. >> rebecca brooks, picture leading news international tonight. criminal investigation, public inquiries. the scrutiny of what went on at her newspaper could continue for years. >> for more on today's news, i'm joined from london by author and journalist peter preston who was the editor of the guardian for a number of years. if i could start, could you explain to viewers around the world and here in the united states just how big a deal this story is and the latest developments art? >> it was all about celebrities. it was difficult to get the public engaged in that. this week, when it was revealed that the telephone of the 13- year-old murder victim had been packed into and a whole variety of other car stories -- hacked into, and a whole variety of other horror stories emerged, now you have a toxic image for the
about libya and the role the u.k. is playing in that, afghanistan. this is all a distraction from a major geopolitical agenda. >> ifill: with all of those things on his plate, though, richard... david cameron. i'm getting everyone's names mixed up tonight. he lives to fight another day? >> yes, i think so. as you said earlier, there were a number of investigations. there's a criminal investigation we will be finding out... there will be a drip feed of e-mails, of reports, of parliamentary select committees and, you know, this will continue to be a bad news story for david cameron. how much worse it get december pends on the contents of some of those e-mails. >> ifill: i guess we have no choice but to watch. richard add dallas, heather conley, thank you both so much. >> brown: next, compelling insurers to cover contraception. the new health care reform law that president obama signed last year not only expands the number of people who get coverage. it also requires the secretary of health and human services to determine which preventive benefits should be provided by all insurers.
sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the mayor of kandahar was assassinated in southern afghanistan today. a suicide bomber hid explosives in his turban, before blowing himself up inside a heavily-fortified government compound. it's the third taliban attack on an afghan powerbroker in the south in more than two weeks. the new u.s. ambassador to afghanistan ryan crocker said it's proof the taliban is so damaged, it can't carry out large-scale operations. he spoke today in kabul. >> they've had to kind of regroup and figure out what they can do and, in some cases, that has been assassination. we saw a very similar pattern in iraq. clearly, these are horrific attacks but they can also be interpreted as a sign of significant organizational weakness. >> sreenivasan: a taliban spokesman told the associated press the kandahar mayor was targeted for ordering the destruction of homes city officials claimed were illegally constructed. two children were killed during that demolition. the prime minister of norway today announced an independent commission will review how last week's twin attacks were allowed to
bin laden, not to attack saudi arabia, because he was outside, he was in afghanistan, not to attack saudi arabia. in this country, if you and i re talking about the mafia, we'd call it protectionmoney. that is one area. the people who investigated 9/11, and earlier at the cia, concluded that the saudis had been paying protection money for a long time. the second area that i think is especially interesting, and that both the joint inqui for congress and the 9/11 commission people delved into is the evidence on the ground in california, where the first two terrorists, the ones already identified by the cia, arrived. they arrived and the evidence suggests that an imam, the religious man at the saudi consulate first okayed them as sort -- first gave them a sort of tour of the area in los angeles. after that, the two of them connected with another saudi, who was paid from official sources, but apparently not for doing any known work, who had been thought of for a long time as a saudi agent. they connected with him in a meeting that was odd. he says he heard arabic being spoken in a resta
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)